CBD Salt Scrub to Get Your Glow Back

Jessica McKeil June 8, 2020 0 comments

If your skin needs a little pick-me-up, CBD salt scrub is it!

The change of seasons is here, and your skin has taken a beating. Whether the harsh conditions and subzero of winter or the harsh sun and pool chemicals of the summer, skin can lose its lustrous glow. A weekly at-home spa night, featuring a CBD salt scrub, combines the benefits of cannabinoid skincare with a gentle exfoliation. Cannabinoids, like CBD, are plant-based additives for topical treatments like creams, oils, and scrubs.

The Potential Benefits of CBD Skin Care

Cannabinoids blend well into topical treatments because of their molecular makeup. All cannabinoids, including the intoxicating THC and soothing CBD, are lipophilic. Lipophilic compounds are those that have an affinity towards oily or fatty molecules, and naturally repelled by water. This lipophilic nature of cannabinoids is the reason why they work so well when combined in fat-based edibles (think MCT cannabis oil or Cannabis-infused keto fat bombs)

The human body is up to sixty percent water, so unfortunately, cannabinoids don’t always mix well with it. Cannabinoids don’t have a particularly high bioavailability when eaten, nor when consumed through smoke or vape. However, the skin is a different matter.

A thin, transparent layer of oils covers the surface of our skin. These oils evolved specifically to protect us from harsh environments. Under normal conditions, the skin layer of lipids (oils) help to protect against environmental dangers. According to Bloom and Mouritsen’s Handbook of Biological Physics, these include, “water loss, microbial invasion, ultraviolet irradiation, mechanical trauma,” and other damages. [1]Bloom, M., Mouritsen, O.G., Handbook of Biological Physics. Volume 1, 1995, Pages 65-95. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1383-8121(06)80019-9. … Continue reading

Cannabinoids readily absorb particularly well into this lovely layer of oils covering the surface of the skin. Beyond improvements to bioavailability, topical applications generally avoid many other issues as well, including first-pass metabolism effect.

CBD is Non-Intoxicating

Cannabis-infused creams and balms are all non-intoxicating, even if they contain THC. At the molecular level, cannabinoids only penetrate the skin and don’t make it into the bloodstream. This makes cannabis-based skincare much more widely applicable than smoked or edible forms.

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According to “Cannabinoid Delivery Systems for Pain and Inflammation Treatment,” published in Molecules, there is early evidence that topical cannabinoids may have anti-inflammatory action. As the authors stated in this 2018 piece, “Topical administration is potentially ideal for localised symptoms, such as those found in dermatological conditions and arthritis but also in peripheral neuropathic pain.” [2]Bruni, N., Della Pepa, C., Oliaro-Bosso, S., Pessione, E., Gastaldi, D., & Dosio, F. (2018). Cannabinoid Delivery Systems for Pain and Inflammation Treatment. Molecules (Basel, Switzerland), … Continue reading

And this is only the beginning. Cannabis is making its way into all areas of skincare. But, scientists may need a few more years to catch up to all the claims currently being advertised.

CBD Salt Scrub in jar

How to Make a CBD Salt Scrub

Adapted from a recipe available at the Coconut Mama.

Ingredients:

You’ll also need a medium-sized pot, a small mixing bowl, spoon, and large glass jar for storage. A blender or food processor would also work to bring this recipe together faster and without so much elbow grease.

Directions:

  1. Firstly, gently warm coconut oil on the stove (or in the microwave) until liquified. Allow cooling until only warm to the touch but still liquid.
  2. Secondly, combine all ingredients in the mixing bowl or blender. Stir to combine. If using a blender, pulse a few times.
  3. Thirdly, while still liquid, pour into the large glass jar and allow it to cool. Cover and store in a cool, dark, and dry environment. Do not store in the bathroom, as this environment is generally too moist.

How to Use:

  1. During your next shower, have your CBD salt scrub jar handy. Secondly, use soap or body wash as normal.
  2. When you’re at the end of your shower, use your hand to remove roughly a ¼ cup of CBD salt scrub.
  3. Move out of the shower stream. Gently massage the CBD salt scrub onto your skin, working in small circular motions.
  4. Lastly, rinse off under warm water.
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CBD Salt Scrub smeared on white background

Make it Yours With Essential Oils

What’s great about this recipe is that you can personalize it with the addition of your favorite essential oils. As any beauty guru will tell you, essential oils have potential benefits for skin care as well.

Which oil ends up perfuming your CBD salt scrub is ultimately up to your personal tastes and skincare concerns. Keep in mind, some essential oils are natural irritants, and it may be worth diluting or testing on a small patch of skin before going all-in.

Here are a few common essential oils (and potential benefits) you may want to consider for your CBD salt scrub:

Chamomile

The very same plant traditionally used in calming teas may also have benefits for skincare. According to a summary of the therapeutic benefits of chamomile, published in 2018, it may have anti-inflammatory asset and could help other oils penetrate deeper into the surface of the skin. [3]Srivastava, J. K., Shankar, E., & Gupta, S. (2010). Chamomile: A herbal medicine of the past with bright future. Molecular medicine reports, 3(6), 895–901. https://doi.org/10.3892/mmr.2010.377.

Frankincense

A longtime addition to creams and face oils, frankincense is presently renowned for its rejuvenating powers. It’s hard to prove the claimed anti-aging powers of this essential oil scientifically. Conversely, research in Biochem Open said it, “possesses promising potential to modulate the biological processes of inflammation and tissue remodeling in human skin.” In their assessment, the authors detailed anti-inflammatory, immune-modulating, and wound healing properties.[4]Han, X., Rodriguez, D., & Parker, T. L. (2017). Biological activities of frankincense essential oil in human dermal fibroblasts. Biochimie open, 4, 31–35. … Continue reading

Lavender

There are few essential oils more associated with spa treatments than lavender oil. In aromatherapy circles, lavender is generally sold as an anti-anxiety scent and a potential de-stressor. Further, in the research, lavender also has several suggested therapeutic benefits. For example, in 2013, researchers published a paper in Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine which summarizes the potential qualities of lavender as the following: “anxiolytic, mood stabilizer, sedative, analgesic, and anticonvulsive and neuroprotective.” [5]Koulivand, P. H., Khaleghi Ghadiri, M., & Gorji, A. (2013). Lavender and the nervous system. Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM, 2013, 681304. … Continue reading

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CBD Salt Scrub being put onto white woman's face

An Easy Remedy for Dry Skin

CBD skincare is exploding. However, it’s also an expensive premium product. Conversely, many skincare products, like this CBD salt scrub, are a snap as DIY with ingredients you probably already have on hand. Even better, the ingredients are affordable and you don’t need any special skills or equipment.

Make sure you look after your skin after a season of harsh environmental exposure. You can reap any potential anti-inflammatory and calming benefits for yourself, by making a batch of CBD salt scrub. Gently massage the soothing cannabinoid mixture into your skin as a gentle reminder to take time out for yourself.

References

1 Bloom, M., Mouritsen, O.G., Handbook of Biological Physics. Volume 1, 1995, Pages 65-95. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1383-8121(06)80019-9. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1383812106800199.
2 Bruni, N., Della Pepa, C., Oliaro-Bosso, S., Pessione, E., Gastaldi, D., & Dosio, F. (2018). Cannabinoid Delivery Systems for Pain and Inflammation Treatment. Molecules (Basel, Switzerland), 23(10), 2478. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23102478.
3 Srivastava, J. K., Shankar, E., & Gupta, S. (2010). Chamomile: A herbal medicine of the past with bright future. Molecular medicine reports, 3(6), 895–901. https://doi.org/10.3892/mmr.2010.377.
4 Han, X., Rodriguez, D., & Parker, T. L. (2017). Biological activities of frankincense essential oil in human dermal fibroblasts. Biochimie open, 4, 31–35. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopen.2017.01.003.
5 Koulivand, P. H., Khaleghi Ghadiri, M., & Gorji, A. (2013). Lavender and the nervous system. Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM, 2013, 681304. https://doi.org/10.1155/2013/681304.
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Jessica McKeil

Jessica McKeil is a freelance writer focused on the medical marijuana industry, from production methods to medicinal applications. She is lucky enough to live in beautiful British Columbia, Canada where the cannabis industry is exploding. When not writing, she spends much of her time exploring in the coastal forests.

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