My Arthritis Would Keep Me In Bed if I Didn’t Have Cannabis

RxLeaf July 16, 2018 0 comments

Cannabis is my arthritis treatment. The only one that works.

Editor’s Note: Any testimonials or endorsements found on this site are for anecdotal purposes only. The information in Rxleaf testimonials is not intended as direct medical advice, nor should it be relied upon as a substitute for consultations with qualified healthcare professionals who are intimately knowledgeable about your individual medical needs.

I have a genetic condition called Hereditary Haemochromotosis. It’s a fancy way of saying my body doesn’t metabolize iron. I was in for a lifetime of arthritis treatment.

Unfortunately, I was not diagnosed until my late 30s and this led to an acceleration of arthritis in my body (CPPD). Another fancy term, this time meaning I have calcium deposits chewing at my joints. It hurts a lot.

I haven’t been able to walk or drive myself for a few months now…and my body also doesn’t tolerate any NSAIDs. Not even baby aspirin…which means I have opiates or cannabis for pain control options.

I chose cannabis.

Does it erase the pain? No…I’m well beyond that. However, I am 100% functional mentally because of my pain control choice of cannabis and NOT opiates. I wouldn’t be able to get out of bed without cannabis. Cannabis is also what I credit for the fact that I do not have any organ damage at all, which is a hallmark of this condition.

For me, the mix of CBD and THC is very important…topicals help dull the pain from the outside, consuming it both helps my body heal and lowers my pain response. The last time my body had this high level of pain legal cannabis wasn’t an option for me due to where I lived at the time. Now it is, and I’ve been able to avoid taking leave from work this time, as opposed to the 6 weeks of leave I needed in 2015.

Cannabis is my medicine.

arthritis treatment for haemochromatosis represented by graphic showing liver damage

From RxLeaf: How Cannabis May Work As Arthritis Treatment

Cannabis is growing in popularity among arthritis patients as a way to treat pain and inflammation. And the mechanics of how cannabinoids work in the human body tell us why. By interacting with cannabinoid receptors to lower inflammation, they offer a novel approach to arthritis treatment.

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A study [1]Dunn, Sara L, et al. Expression of Cannabinoid Receptors in Human Osteoarthritic Cartilage: Implications for Future Therapies. Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., 1 Jan. 2016, … Continue reading published in Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research (2016) showed how cannabinoid therapy could potentially help treat osteoarthritis. Scientists found that through binding with the body’s CB2 receptor, cannabinoids can trigger an anti-inflammatory response in human articular cartilage.

This is intriguing news, as CB2 receptors have been found in the joint tissues of patients suffering from arthritis inflammation. THC specifically activates the CB2 receptor, resulting in an analgesic effect. However, it isn’t the only cannabinoid to play a role in arthritis inflammation and pain management.

CBD Recommended for Arthritis

Recently, the Arthritis Foundation released recommendations for patients interested in trying CBD. Why? Through a survey of 2,600 patients, the foundation discovered that a majority of respondents have already turned to CBD for treatment. While scientific research about CBD’s efficacy is still underway, a handful of studies have supported CBD for arthritis.

A study [2]Hammell, D C, et al. Transdermal Cannabidiol Reduces Inflammation and Pain-Related Behaviours in a Rat Model of Arthritis. European Journal of Pain (London, England), U.S. National Library of … Continue reading published in the European Journal of Pain (2016) concluded that topical administration of CBD showed signs of pain relief in rat models of arthritis. And not only did it relieve pain and inflammation, but it did so without adverse side effects.

arthritis treatment represented by woman holding her wrist

Fighting Inflammation

As detailed in a review study [3]Bruni, Natascia, et al. Cannabinoid Delivery Systems for Pain and Inflammation Treatment. Molecules (Basel, Switzerland), MDPI, 27 Sept. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6222489/ published in Molecules (2018), arthritis requires long-term treatment in order to battle the chronic inflammatory nature of the disease. Synthetic anti-inflammatory compounds, such as NSAIDs, steroids and opioids, come with detrimental side effects. The authors of the study acknowledged that research has increasingly shown that the endocannabinoid system is involved in arthritis-related pain, making cannabinoid therapy a promising option.

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This study concluded that transdermal cannabinoid delivery via topicals can provide relief to a localized area — which may be ideal for many arthritis patients. The authors also noted that transdermal administration of CBD resulted in higher absorption than oral administration.

More Study Needed on Arthritis Treatment

As seen in the story above, some patients are finding that THC and CBD can potentially relieve pain due to inflammation.

Further, for the millions of Americans suffering from chronic pain, cannabinoid therapy may provide an option with fewer side effects. More rigorous study is needed, as well as human trials. But as the Arthritis Foundation has suggested, it’s possible that cannabinoids may help.

References

1 Dunn, Sara L, et al. Expression of Cannabinoid Receptors in Human Osteoarthritic Cartilage: Implications for Future Therapies. Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., 1 Jan. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5576594/
2 Hammell, D C, et al. Transdermal Cannabidiol Reduces Inflammation and Pain-Related Behaviours in a Rat Model of Arthritis. European Journal of Pain (London, England), U.S. National Library of Medicine, July 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4851925/
3 Bruni, Natascia, et al. Cannabinoid Delivery Systems for Pain and Inflammation Treatment. Molecules (Basel, Switzerland), MDPI, 27 Sept. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6222489/

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